Insects that look like sticks, behave like fruit, and move like seeds

Male spiny leaf insect, Extatosoma tiaratum. James O’Hanlon, Author providedJames O'Hanlon, University of New England The key to a stick insect’s survival may be allowing their eggs to be eaten and excreted by birds, according to new Japanese research. Phasmatodea – more commonly known as stick insects – were so named because they genuinely look … Continue reading Insects that look like sticks, behave like fruit, and move like seeds

Strange things for science

It is a strange life, that of a scientist. Each individual must find their own niche to specialise in meaning that no two scientists’ daily work lives are the same. One day you can be standing in front of a lecture hall filled with 200 people, the next you could be setting up camp under … Continue reading Strange things for science

Tales from the field – and other nonsense. Part 1.

With an address and a mobile phone number scrawled onto a piece of paper I jumped into a taxi and headed towards the Singaporean suburbs. Away from the glossy façade of the CBD and the bizarre spectacle that is herds of businessmen, complete with neckties and suit jackets, galloping hurriedly around the humid tropics. Away … Continue reading Tales from the field – and other nonsense. Part 1.

A tale of natural history and standing on the shoulders of giants.

The orchid mantis: a tale of natural history and standing on the shoulders of giants. By James C. O'Hanlon Few animals, especially insects, have earned as mythical a reputation as the orchid mantis. Scattered amongst centuries old books, hidden away in musty library basement compactors, are a handful of tales of an impossible insect, more … Continue reading A tale of natural history and standing on the shoulders of giants.